PhD position ‘Dress, gender, and identity in N-W provinces of the Roman Empire’ (deadline 1 November 2017)

Research at the Faculty of Humanities is carried out by six research schools under the aegis of the Amsterdam Institute for Humanities Research. The Amsterdam School of Historical Studies (ASH), one of the six research schools, currently has a vacant PhD position as part of the NWO-funded  Gravitaton Programme Anchoring Innovation, led by National Research School OIKOS.

Project description

The expansion of the Roman Empire and the introduction of imperial rule profoundly changed the lives of men and women in Italy and the Roman provinces. This project will investigate whether, and if so how, these changes were anchored in respect of (accepted or rejected) gender roles and (ethnic) identity by looking at the relationship between dress, gender and identity in the northern and western provinces of the Roman Empire, mainly on the basis of (funerary) reliefs. Applicants are invited to delineate which region(s) they would like to work on.
The main research question is: how did the innovations of the Roman Empire affect the representation (particularly the dress, including attributes and jewellery) of people in the provinces, and how were these innovations anchored in existing dress styles, ethnic traditions and gender norms? What were the reasons for men and women in the provinces to emphasise a local or rather a Roman identity and how did this fit in with new or existing gender roles?
This project ties in with the contested issue of ‘Romanisation’ (or globalisation, creolisation, discrepant identies etc.), connecting it with gender and identity in the Roman provinces and trying to come to grips with the different types of impact Roman rule may have had on men and women in the northern and western provinces.

Project description

The expansion of the Roman Empire and the introduction of imperial rule profoundly changed the lives of men and women in Italy and the Roman provinces. This project will investigate whether, and if so how, these changes were anchored in respect of (accepted or rejected) gender roles and (ethnic) identity by looking at the relationship between dress, gender and identity in the northern and western provinces of the Roman Empire, mainly on the basis of (funerary) reliefs. Applicants are invited to delineate which region(s) they would like to work on.
The main research question is: how did the innovations of the Roman Empire affect the representation (particularly the dress, including attributes and jewellery) of people in the provinces, and how were these innovations anchored in existing dress styles, ethnic traditions and gender norms? What were the reasons for men and women in the provinces to emphasise a local or rather a Roman identity and how did this fit in with new or existing gender roles?
This project ties in with the contested issue of ‘Romanisation’ (or globalisation, creolisation, discrepant identies etc.), connecting it with gender and identity in the Roman provinces and trying to come to grips with the different types of impact Roman rule may have had on men and women in the northern and western provinces.

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